2014 Chubbuck “jumbo” :: build in progress.

The back is being carved while the top awaits its turn.  The rim’s soundport is finished and ready for the mold.

New Chubbuck jumbo acoustic :: soundport

The soundport is finished and the top is waiting to be carved.

1992 Fender Jazz Plus V 5 string [9.3 lbs] :: new bone nut and setup

This features a Kubicki preamp and Lace Sensor J pickups.  The controls are top to bottom:

  1. stacked master volume :: pan between pickups
  2. stacked treble cut/boost :: bass cut/boost
  3. 4-way rotary with standby (mute), active with mid boost (internal trim pot to adjust mids), active and passive

The bass came into the shop quite neglected.  It was really grimy (especially the fingerboard), only strung with the A, D & G strings and missing the nut.  The low B saddle screw was bent and missing the set screws that adjust the height.

I first cleaned the guitar and replaced the saddle screws on the B.  A new bone nut was fabricated and a fresh 9V battery installed  The bass was set up with a set of  D’Addario EXL 160-5 round wound strings.

Chubbuck Guitars :: Labels fresh off of the printer. Eventually I want to try screen print these.

1992 Fender Jazz Plus V 5 string [9.3 lbs] :: new bone nut and setup.

I’ll post a better photo later, but it’s #fishEyeFriday !

1951 Gibson Southern Jumbo [3.8 lbs] :: bridge reglue, back structural repairs, setup.

This guitar has been through a lot in it’s 63 years, most notably a complete refinish a long time ago.  There are quite a bit of sanding swirls and ripples left in the body and the finish has a very open-pore look.  I also suspect that the top and back plates were heavily thinned in the stripping process as they are very flexible and yield a loud, open tone.  Many signs of brace and crack repairs can be found when peeking inside.

I first re-glued the bridge as it was pulling from the top.  This bridge has been removed before as the original bolts under the pearloid dot inlays were absent.  The back had a cracked brace end that needed to be glued, along with some previously repaired binding damage that needed some rework.  The back’s center seam was open from the 4th brace to the tail and sections of the seam reinforcement braces were peeling off.  I reglued the center seam, along with the loose reinforcements and added a mahogany cleat near the tail block.

There was just enough saddle exposure to allow me to get the action down, but ideally the guitar is ready for a neck reset.  I suspect that the thinning of the top during the stripping process has exaggerated the belly of the top and is contributing to the low neck angle.

All in all, this slope-shoulder dred sounds great with a funky vibe!

2006 Reverend Flatroc [8.1 lbs] :: setup.

These Revtron pickups (Reverend’s take on Gretsch’s Filtertron) are a refreshing sound compared to the often “round” humbucker and the articulate single coil.  The last control knob is a bass contour that passively rolls off the bass to keep things tight in your rig.  I dig!

The Bigsby vibrato, bridge and string tree were lubricated and set up for D’Addario XL 9’s.

2008 Sadowsky Modern 24 MM [7.2 lbs] :: bass neck re-carve.

I have re-carved another Sadowsky J neck for this player and he prefers a thinner neck and super low action.  Both necks were refinished with a “Tung Oil Finish” that is really a wiping varnish as it has a resin mixed in with the oil to speed up drying.  This is a super easy, very tactile finish on a maple neck.

This bass was in recently for a setup: [photo]

Here is the Sadowsky J when it was in the shop: [photo]

1976 Gibson ES-175D [6.9 lbs] :: new stainless steel frets, bone nut and setup. [photo 3]

The original frets were pulled, board planed and new stainless steel frets installed and dressed.  Look back through my feed and you can see this was the first guitar in my new StewMac neck jig.  Can’t wait for the next fret job as this one went extremely well.

The bridge foot was better fit to the top [note the non-original tune-o-matic bridge top; originals are rosewood].  The fit of the loose tuner bushings was improved and the guitar set up for D’Addario XL EJ21’s [12-54 roundwound with a wound G].

1976 Gibson ES-175D [6.9 lbs] :: new stainless steel frets, bone nut and setup. [photo 2]

From 1975-77, Gibson used an oval waterslide decal on the rear of the headstock as opposed to their commonly embossed serial numbers.  At first I was not aware of this so my mind went immediately to “this is a fake!!”.  After a bit of research, I was relieved to find that this was authentic and did not  have to tell the client “bad news”.  Good ol’ wacky Gibson serial numbers …

1976 Gibson ES-175D [6.9 lbs] :: new stainless steel frets, bone nut and setup. [photo 1]

The press-in bushing on this 1970’s Gibson have separate washers.  Over time these bushings can become loose and pull up out of the peghead.  These washers are then free to make God-awful sympathetic buzzes and rattles.  I tightened the fit of the bushings by using super glue to stiffen the wood fibers in the tuner holes.  Before installing the bushings, I lightly glued the washers to the bushings so if the bushings rise up again in the future the washers will not be free to vibrate.

2000 Washburn D42S [4.8 lbs] :: setup.

This is one of the loudest guitars I’ve heard in a while.  And loud usually doesn’t mean great tone, but this one sounded pretty damn good!